Hiroshima University Syllabus

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Japanese
Academic Year 2023Year School/Graduate School School of Economics Economics Day Course
Lecture Code G6010313 Subject Classification Specialized Education
Subject Name 経済学史2
Subject Name
(Katakana)
ケイザイガクシ2
Subject Name in
English
History of Economic Doctrines 2
Instructor MIYAZAWA KAZUTOSHI
Instructor
(Katakana)
ミヤザワ カズトシ
Campus Higashi-Hiroshima Semester/Term 3rd-Year,  First Semester,  2Term
Days, Periods, and Classrooms (2T) Tues5-8:ECON B255
Lesson Style Lecture Lesson Style
(More Details)
 
Lecture (Face-to-face) 
Credits 2.0 Class Hours/Week   Language of Instruction J : Japanese
Course Level 3 : Undergraduate High-Intermediate
Course Area(Area) 24 : Social Sciences
Course Area(Discipline) 03 : Economics
Eligible Students 3rd and 4th year students
Keywords Themes and methods of economics, marcket economy, capitalisit economy, Lausanne school, Austrian school, Cambridge school, Marxian school, Keynesian school. 
Special Subject for Teacher Education   Special Subject  
Class Status
within Educational
Program
(Applicable only to targeted subjects for undergraduate students)
 
Criterion referenced
Evaluation
(Applicable only to targeted subjects for undergraduate students)
Economic Analysis
(Abilities and Skills)
・The ability to develop historical analysis applying knowledge on economic history, history of economic doctrines and political economy. 
Class Objectives
/Class Outline
This lecture aims to comprehend major economic doctorines which appeared since the middle of 19th century to the end of 20th century.   
Class Schedule lesson1     Guidance
lesson2     Decline of classical political economy
lesson3     Political economy of K. Marx 1
lesson4     Political economy of K. Marx 2
lesson5     Economic Thought of Historical school  
lesson6     Marginal revolution of eocomomic theory
lesson7     Economics of L. Walras 1
lesson8     Economics of L. Walras 2
lesson9     Economic theory and thought of Austrian school 1
lesson10    Economic theory and thought of Austrian school 2
lesson11    Economics of A. Marshall
lesson12    Economics of J. Schumpeter and K. Wicksell
lesson13    Economics of J. M. Keynes 1
lesson14    Economics of J. M. Keynes 2
lesson15    Review 
Text/Reference
Books,etc.
Handouts will be distributed in each class. 
PC or AV used in
Class,etc.
 
(More Details) Handouts 
Learning techniques to be incorporated  
Suggestions on
Preparation and
Review
Exercises will be shown in the lecture notes.
Each member should understand the theoretical and methodological character of  various economic schools and estimate the merit of each school.
Lesson 1. Why was the classical political economy dissolved?
Lesson 2.  Explain the surplus value theory of K. Marx.
Lesson 3.  Why did Marx consider that capitalist economy would collapse?
Lesson 4.  Compare the economics of A. Smith and that of F. List.
Lesson 5. Consider the implication of the controvercy between G. Schmoller and C. Menger.
Lesson 6. What is marginal revolution in the history of economics?
Lesson 7.  Explain the aim and method of the general equilibrium theory.     
Lesson 8.  Explain the development of the general equilibrium theory in the 20th century.
Lesson 9.  Explain the role of entrepreneur in the economics of J. Schumpeter.
Lesson 10.  How does money emerge in the economics of C. Menger?
Lesson 11.  Why does the interest exist according to Bohm=Bawerk?
Lesson 12.  Consider the implication of neo-liberalism of F. Hayek in modern economy.
Lesson 13.  Explain the structure of the economics of J. M. Keynes.
Lesson 14.  Explain the development of the Keynesian economics in the 20th century.
Lesson 15.  Summarize the character of each economic school.
 
Requirements nothing 
Grading Method Reports:40%, Final exam:60%. 
Practical Experience  
Summary of Practical Experience and Class Contents based on it  
Message Read classical books that have influenced the history of political economy as many as possible. 
Other   
Please fill in the class improvement questionnaire which is carried out on all classes.
Instructors will reflect on your feedback and utilize the information for improving their teaching. 
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